2020 Edition of Directory of Corporate Art Collections– 30% Advance Discount

Our flagship reference source — in continuous publication since 1983 — available in either a pdf digital edition or printed book
The 2020-2021 International Directory of Corporate Art Collections will be published on January 1, 2020 and is can now be ordered with a pre-publication discount of 30% !

……..it is simply the best source of information to what is happening with art in business and the workplace

The only source of information about nearly 700 companies and businesses around the world, that are buying art, displaying art in un-traditional spaces, commissioning art, sponsoring art, and becoming partners with artists to create new ways to bring art into communities and people’s lives.

40 additional corporate collections have been added to this edition, and the existing information has been updated and expanded

the three parts of the Directory are

1 ) Europe and Asia Pacific

2 ) North America

3 ) South and Central America

The Appendix gives information on 95 collections that have been dispersed, absorbed into the assets of another company, or donated to museum and public collections.

As a bonus, we are also including the ebook, “Insider’s Guide to Art in the Workplace (a $19.95 value).

As the founder and editor of the International Directory of Corporate Art Collections, I’ve been documenting corporate art collections for over 35 years . … And I’ve been watching while the field has transformed itself…….

How, during the past 100 years, it has grown from a small interesting specialty in the art world into a multi-million dollar (or euro) business sector,

how it has become such an important trend, that it’s had a major impact on the artworld,

how it has grown, retreated, and grown again like a phoenix, and has become transformed in the process each time.

how companies have become more sophisticated and subtle in using art to enhance their company’s image, and

how today it is being used in the workplace to stimulate creative thinking and out-of-the-box solutions

You will see why corporations are still the most important buyers in the art market. And you will understand how the companies make their buying decisions – whether you are an artist, art gallery, art consultant, auction house, or museum.

This eBook reveals how a corporate curator thinks, how they make their decisions, and how the corporations run their art programs,

It is virtually a synthesis of the insights I’ve gained during 35 years of documenting corporate art collections, and being involved in the world of corporate art.

The ebook and Directory provide the two key research tools that will give you the ability to reach the corporate art world, decide which companies to contact, and understand how they make their collecting decisions.

 

For ordering information please go here

or contact me at pubications@humanities-exchange.org.

 

How Art and Artists are Transforming the Workplace

 ‘If the environment that you work in can be improved, then the quality of your employees’ life and their work will improve. Companies therefore need to create a stimulating work environment, …. and the catalyst to create that environment is an art program.’

Michael Klein, curator of the Microsoft Art program, 1999


– 2005

Helaba Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen by Kalin Lindena, Untitled, 2007, Wall collage © Courtesy of the artist, Photograph: Wolfgang Günzel, Offenbach
Helaba Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen, by Kalin Lindena, Untitled, 2007, Wall collage, © Courtesy of the artist, Photograph: Wolfgang Günzel, Offenbach

 

Throughout  history, artists have been able to work and were supported by patrons in different ways.   In the West, during the Middle Ages  the Church was the largest patron of art, and artists were commissioned to create in the service of religion.   During the Renaissance, the art patrons were the royal and aristocratic families  that used art to glorify their histories and accomplishments.

Today, art and artists have found a totally new patron – the  businesses that are realizing that art can transform the workplace and that it should be an integral part of a motivating and productive working environment.  They are actively including it in their mission statements and in the context of their broader business philosophy.

Some of these new developments and ways that art has been transforming the work environment around the world, are analyzed in our new course for artists on Creating Art for Non-Traditional Spaces.  The course is an essential tool and resource for artists  that want to expand their opportunities for commissions and selling their artworks, and protect their cultural property by learning more about copyright, commissioning, licensing, and working with non-traditional spaces.


Here are some of the ways that art has been transforming the workplace.

“Art functions as a catalyst for communication and shows us what might be possible if we let our spirits soar free.”

The AkzoNobel Art Foundation’s mission is to create a more dynamic and inspiring work environment for its employees. The core values and beliefs are that art is forward-looking; encourages new ideas, challenges peoples’ beliefs and ideas, and stimulates creative thinking.      With this ideal in mind, an innovative way to structure and organize the collection was developed by working with themes to make it more accessible for viewers. The main themes are color and research, space, and the individual and society. These three themes have been divided into several sub-themes, such as environment or abstraction.

Allens law firm in Australia  displays its art throughout the offices, which  has inspired partners and staff to start their own collections.    Powerful visual statements have been developed and are presented as you enter any Allens office. The Melbourne reception is a large gallery space, with works by artists whose multicultural, non- Western backgrounds highlight the cultural diversity not only of Australia but of Australian contemporary art practice.   In Sydney, the vast atrium of the Norman Foster-designed building gave the opportunity to include a   highly visible artist project space on each floor. The commissioned site-specific art project dominates the view from glass-fronted lifts, again highlighting the role contemporary art can play in the workplace.


tn_Att 0000120880.Jilali Gharbaoui. Djilis. Gouache sur papier. 50x71 cm. 1961. Collection Attijariwafa bank
Jilali Gharbaoui, Djilis, 1961, Gouache on paper, Collection Attijariwafa Bank, © Jilali Gharbaoui

 

In the Attijariwafa Bank in Morocco, about half of the works are located in the company’s headquarters which includes the Espace D’Art Actua  which stages two exhibitions each year that are open to the public. The remainder of the works are on display in the bank’s network of branches throughout Morocco.  The Bank’s ‘Academy’ programme, has a teaching cycle of practical workshops and theory of artistic expression, literary writing and multimedia for 100 students in primary and secondary public school classrooms in Casablanca.


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Alice Bailly (1872–1938), La Fantaisie équestre de la Dame Rose I, 1913, Oil on canvas, Photograph: Luc Chessex, Lausanne, Banque Cantonale Vaudoise.

The activities of the Banque Cantonale Vaudoise have created a vibrant local art scene.  Its  collection is both  uniform and eclectic – all of the artists have ties to the canton, and includes different generations, styles and technique, and has a strong focus on contemporary talent, supporting artists throughout their careers.  Since each of the pieces collected  was created by an artist who has lived or worked in the area, the art illustrates both the breadth and quality of the art scene in the Vaud region


Belgacom Hall Vip
Jeff Wall, Children, 1988, Nine transparencies in lightboxes, Courtesy of Jeff Wall, Belgacom

 

“Helping to change a corporate culture using an art program”

Belgacom’s art program has been directed at the employees of Belgacom and the works are displayed in the company’s buildings in Belgium.  This art program has been designed to change the psychology of the staff because there had been a shift in the agency from a monopolistic situation to more aggressive competition. The Belgacom Group believed that the presence of contemporary art would encourage this essential evolution.  The active educational program includes guided tours, creative workshops for children of the staff and a treasure hunt with clues, and art is often displayed as a screen saver that leads to information on the intranet.

“In the present lies the future – this is the concept behind Helaba’s approach to collecting”

With more than 1,000 works of art, the Helaba Landesbank Hessen-Thüringen first appeared in the corporate art world as a patron of studios for artists in its bank buildings.  Helaba has been concentrating on the works of contemporary artists, and the collection highlights lines of development by acquiring entire complexes or groups of work. More recent artistic statements are placed in relation to established ones, as this juxtaposition corresponds to the forms of expression used in contemporary art production. According to Helaba, ‘The main thing is that the art collection touches people and stimulates dialogue.’


Zoderer_4232
Beat Zoderer, Flickenkugel, 2011, Paint on aluminium, riveted, © Beat Zoderer. Borusan Collection.

 

An innovative approach has been developed in Turkey.  One of Turkey’s largest and leading industrial conglomerates, Borusan Holding, has long been a strong supporter of the arts.   It has also achieved a new level of involvement by the staff and general public by creating well-designed display spaces in the office that opens as a museum at the weekend and is staffed by employees on a voluntary basis. Registered as a museum with the government, it opened in September 2011, and its mission is to make the collection accessible to a wider audience and to increase the awareness of flourishing contemporary art in Turkey.   Borusan Artcentre/Istanbul, had a residency programme for young visual artists to work in studios open to the public. Ten artists were selected to have a studio space for two years.

One of Saxo Bank’s core values is ‘Pride’ – pride in one’s job, one’s accomplishments and one’s employer.

The bank’s investment in and commitment to innovative architecture, design and visual arts have been central to this goal, and as a ressult, Saxo Bank has created a working environment that is welcoming and inspiring.
Art works by both established and emerging artists, predominantly young Danish artists, were commissioned and purchased.  Saxo Bank also sponsors artistic projects that stimulate discussion as well as entertain. Saxo Bank believes that “art – including fine art, music, literature etc – is the barometer of a culture and that it provides the moment of rest that makes it possible for all individuals to reach their personal goals.”

 

“For clients and employees, the art collection can be thought-provoking and a stimulus for ideas”

As part of its commitment to encourage young talent, Credit Suisse starts acquiring works from artists at an early stage in their career and the bank supports individual artists over the long term as their oeuvre evolves. Credit Suisse also commissions site-specific artworks for particular locations by inviting artists to submit proposals.

The art that is hung and displayed throughout Credit Suisse premises cultivates a climate that is receptive to innovation and change. For clients and employees, these artworks can be thought provoking and a stimulus for ideas. They challenge conventional modes of perception and provoke discussion. Overall, the Credit Suisse collection represents a corporate culture that advocates open dialogue and enacts its commitment to art in the everyday world.

 

Reflections on the current diversity of artistic expression in the 21st century”

The art collection is a key component of the corporate culture and mirrors DekaBank’s social commitment in the cultural area.  Internationally recognized artists like Liam Gillick and Katharina Grosse were commissioned to create extensive artworks. The focus is on pieces that deal with socially relevant topics or that stimulate discussion about the definition of art within a contemporary context. The collection is displayed at DekaBank’s office buildings in Frankfurt am Main and Luxembourg.

 

“A creative vision for Latin American and Caribbean regional development with the IDB Bank”

When the centre was established in 1992, its two primary objectives were:  to contribute to social development by providing grants to small-scale cultural projects that have positive social impact in the region; and  to showcase the artistic expressions of the IDB member countries, with emphasis on Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC).   The IDB Cultural Center has become a showcase for the artistic talent of the LAC Region, through cultural programmes that bring understanding between the region and the rest of the world.

 

Sharing its passion for the preservation of the country’s unique artistic heritage that forms part of its business philosophy

Telkom Art Collection photos_html_69da7ddcA history of contemporary art in South Africa cannot escape the very politicized socio-economic conditions under which South Africans have lived.

The Telkom Art Collection shows work by a range of artists representing different aspects of the spectrum in terms of personal circumstances and opportunities.

The Telkom Art Collection promotes South African art in collaboration with partners in the arts, including individual artists, academics, community-based art organisations and industry bodies such as Business and Arts South Africa  (BASA).

The collection  offers art education programs for employees and their families. These include workshops on printmaking, paper recycling and making crafts from waste, as well as art therapy workshops, lunchtime talks and exhibitions. Since 2002, hundreds of Telkom  shareholders, employees and their children have explored and experienced different art forms at hands-on art workshops.

You can learn more about how art has been used to transform the workplace by participating in the pilot project for the course.  For further information click here:

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Let’s Hit the Road Again — Experience the Era

Celebrating America’s love affair with the automobile — a book for your car loving friends

Let’s Hit the Road Again, our new book and traveling exhibition explores the car’s impact on American life and society and  celebrates America’s love affair with the automobile. 

During the first decades of the 20th century, the automobile transformed the way we live.

For the first time, people  could now hop into their cars, hit the road and escape from the places and circumstances that bound them.  The car gave people freedom – freedom to travel, freedom to explore, freedom to experience new ways of living.


The automobile transformed America — where we live, how we work, how we travel, what the cities and suburbs look like, our environment – all have been profoundly shaped by the car.

In Let’s Hit the Road Again artists from around the world have recycled discarded metal wheel coverings and hubcaps  — and turned them into fascinating and sometimes controversial artworks.

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Take a  trip down memory lane and enjoy how 149 artists from the LandfillArt Collection  have celebrated this unique era .

……… As long as art has existed, some of it has pushed people to look beyond their comfort zones …….  And this book and exhibition will  open your eyes a little wider.

 *   *   *   *

Artists have long used junkyards and trash heaps as source material.  By taking something discarded, they turned it into something beautiful, compelling or provocative.

The artists represented in the LandfillArt Collection,  have become a community encouraging and supporting the creative reuse and recycling of the earth’s resources.   The artists have explored the potential of re-using materials –   in their hands, workroom scraps, broken dishes, and even recycled paint have become art.  They have turned the ordinary into the extraordinary!

With such a diversity of creative expressions and mediums, the artists created a body of work, that makes us pause, ponder, and plan to make a difference in our own world.

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The following are a few of the surprises and stories that await you in Let’s Hit the Road Again

Title of Artwork: Route 66 Revisited, by Thom Roslan

The book explores the lore and popular culture that surrounds some of the iconic cars, and the well- known highways and byways.  Several highways became outright legends on their own. 

Often called “The Mother Road,” Route 66 became one of the most famous roads in the US.  It originally ran from Chicago, before ending in Santa Monica in Los Angeles County, California, covering a total of 2,448 miles (3,940 km). 

US 66 served as a primary route for those who migrated west, especially during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and the road supported the economies of the communities it passed through.

It was recognized in popular culture by both the hit song “Get Your Kicks on Route 66” and  the Route 66 television show in the 1960s. The song “Get your kicks on Route 66.”became a monument to long-distance car travel..

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Highway 61 North –  known as the “Blues Highway,” rivaled Route 66 as the most famous road in American music lore.  It was a major transit route out of the Deep South particularly for African Americans traveling north to Chicago, St Louis and Memphis.

The highway has a long musical history, being the supposed location where singer-songwriter Robert Johnson made a deal with the Devil for his successes.  The road later gave its name to Minnesota native Bob Dylan’s album Highway 61 Revisited.

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At its height, one in every six working Americans worked directly for the automobile industry, and Detroit was its epicenter.

Henry Ford in his own words……

“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”

“Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.”

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Cars of the Stars.   The high end automobiles, such as the Cadillac and Mercedes, became status symbols and were popular with celebrities, and  Hollywood stars. 

By 1910, Cadillac was the first manufacturer to mass-produce cars with enclosed cabins.  They invented climate control.  By 1964, everything on your Caddy could be controlled by thermostat, the first vehicle to ever offer such a cool ride.

The fascinating story behind Al Capone’s infamous getaway car – a Cadillac – that was custom built for him.   The gangster commissioned several armoured cars, but the most famous was a 1928 Cadillac – and thought to be one of the first cars to have body armour and bulletproof glass.

 *   *   *   *

The Pierce-Arrow was a status symbol, owned by many Hollywood stars and celebrities.  Most of the royalty of the world had at least one Pierce-Arrow in its collection. 

Actor Sessue Hayakawa, from the film Bridge on the River Kwai, drove a custom-ordered gold-plated Pierce-Arrow.

In 1909, U.S. President William Howard Taft ordered two Pierce-Arrows to be used for state occasions.

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Many television celebrities were used in car marketing. 

One of the most successful was Dinah Shore .  She was one of the first television celebrities whose name became synonymous with a product   — and during the 50s and early 60s, she was probably most responsible for putting Chevrolet automobiles in the driveways of millions. 

On her TV show she sang “the Chevy jingle” and the song became an anthem for the era; a tune approaching patriotic status.  By 1962-63 Chevy sales alone were more than 2 million a year, and all of the General Motors in those years amounted to half of all vehicles sold in the U.S.

Groucho Marx was another who became identified with a car make.  DeSoto sponsored the popular television game show You Bet Your Life from 1950 – 1958, in which host Groucho Marx urged viewers to visit a DeSoto dealer with the phrase “tell ’em Groucho sent you“, and to “drive a DeSoto before you decide“.  The DeSoto was named for Hernando de Soto to symbolize travel, adventure and pioneering.

 *   *   *   *

Title of Artwork: Chief, by James Dobney

Why Does Pontiac use an Indian as their symbol.   The earliest Pontiac logos, show a side view of a Native American with a distinctive headdress.  

Pontiac,  or Obwandiyag (c. 1720 – 1769) was an Odawa war chief who led Native Americans in a struggle against British military occupation of the Great Lakes region. 

Pontiac’s War began in May 1763 when Pontiac and 300 followers attempted to take Fort Detroit by surprise.  They laid siege to the fort, where they were joined by more than 900 warriors from a half-dozen tribes.

  *   *   *   *

Title:  Chevy to the Levee, By Guinotte Wise

America’s love affair with the automobile was most evident in the music of the era.  

The Day Music Died …. 

So bye-bye, Miss American Pie, Drove my Chevy to the levee, but the levee was dry And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye Singin’ “This’ll be the day that I die, This’ll be the day that I die.”   

Chevy to the levee” is from  “American Pie,” which topped America’s music charts in 1972. Singer and songwriter Don McLean wrote it to mourn the death of three musicians in a 1959 airplane crash. Those who perished the “day the music died” included Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and Jiles Perry Richardson Jr., “the Big Bopper.” The song’s familiar chorus is now part of American pop culture.

“Oh, Lord, won’t you buy me a Mercedes Benz.”  –Janis Joplin

 *   *   *   *

The Volkswagen Beetle is arguably the most recognized industrial product shape ever produced.

But more than that, it has endured for generations, becoming a part of many families’ cultural history.

 *   *   *   *

The Jeep

The Jeep is the oldest four-wheel drive mass-production vehicles now known as SUVs.

“You know it’s important to have a Jeep in Los Angeles. That front wheel drive is crucial when it starts to snow on Rodeo Drive.” –Christopher Guest

 *   *   *   *

Tail Fins and the Designers

With America’s passion for the jet age in the 1950s, the public was obsessed with the need to go fast. 

During the 1960s American automobiles came to resemble the jet with it’s tail fins.  Large tailfins,  designs reminiscent of rockets, and radio antennas that imitated Sputnik were common, due to the efforts of design pioneers such as Harley Earl.  So before the 1950s and 1960s were over,  designers were adding fins to every car they could.

“Dad called General Motors designer Harley Earl’s designs “chrome-plated barges,” .. he said that, if left to his own devices, Harley Earl would put fins on a TV or refrigerator.”   Raymond Loewy

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Vision of the Future

Frank Lloyd Wright had three loves:   cars, architecture and the American landscape.  His annual road trips to Taliesin helped him refresh his architectural perspectve and vision.  And gave him a clear view of the country’s changing landscape, and how automobiles were transforming American society.

In his architectural projects, he designed many car-influenced  structures that included a filling station, a self-service parking garage, a “paradise on wheels housing project,” and, of course, his Jaguar showroom in New York City.

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If you would like a digital pdf copy of the entire 180 page book, you can order it here for $9.95, by clicking on the button below that will take you to paypal. When your payment is credited, I will then send you the pdf via wetransfer.

Thank you for your interest




Book Title: Lets Hit the Road Again
Book Title:  Lets Hit the Road AgainAuthor: Shirley Reiff Howarth
184 pages, 230 illustrations
ISBN: 978–0–943488-27-1 Paperback
ISBN: 978–0–943488-26-4 Hardbound
Published in the United States of America
Book layout and design ©2019 The Humanities Exchange / Shirley Reiff Howarth
Website: : www.humanities-exchange.org
email:  exhibitions@humanities-exchange.orgAvailable from The Humanities Exchange,  Shirley Reiff Howarth,
2840 West Bay Drive, # 250, Belleair Bluffs, Florida 33770
Copies can be ordered from the Humanities Exchange website at:
http://humanities-exchange.org/

Quantity sales. Special discounts are available on quantity purchases by corporations,  associations, and others. For details, contact the address above.

* * *

You can see a full 180 page preview, with over 230 photographs by clicking on the photograph below: Order single copies of the softbound or hardbound book from the preview by clicking on the shopping cart at the top of the preview page


Let’s Hit the Road Again

By Shirley Reiff Howarth

 

* * * * * *

Multple copies are available at a discount price: over 10 copies with a 30% ciscount, and over 20 copies for a 40% discount — contact me for an invoice and shipping costs — publications@humanities-exchange.org

* * * *

If you would like a digital pdf copy of the entire 180 page book, you can order it here for $9.95, by clicking on the button below that will take you to paypal. When your payment is credited, I will then send you the pdf via wetransfer.

Thank you for your interest




Book Title: Lets Hit the Road Again

Author: Shirley Reiff Howarth
184 pages, 230 illustrations
ISBN: 978–0–943488-27-1 Paperback
ISBN: 978–0–943488-26-4 Hardbound
Published in the United States of America
Book layout and design ©2019 The Humanities Exchange / Shirley Reiff Howarth
Website: : www.humanities-exchange.org
email: exhibitions@humanities-exchange.org

Available from The Humanities Exchange, Shirley Reiff Howarth,
2840 West Bay Drive, # 250, Belleair Bluffs, Florida 33770
Copies can be ordered from the Humanities Exchange website at:
http://humanities-exchange.org/

Quantity sales. Special discounts are available on quantity purchases by corporations, associations, and others. For details, contact the address above.

Title: Sky High and Riding Low, by Susan Hammond

“I pesently own a Chrysler 300, and each time I drive to work in New York City I pass the beautiful Chrysler Building  I chose to create a hubcap showing antique Chryslers as well as the historic Chrysler Building.”   — Susan Hammond