How Art Can Transform A Hospital

 

Wonderland Aspen, 2014, by Albert Delamour, Metallic C-Print. Recent acquisition.

Art:  The Cure for the Hospital Environment

For quite some time,  hospitals and medical centers have been incorporating art into their facilities.  Art transforms the environment and fosters a life-affirming, restorative and supportive environment that helps the patients, their families, caregivers, students, faculty and the community.

One of the most innovative is the art program initiated in 2014 by the Montefiore University Hospital for the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, in the Bronx, New York.


The Fine Art Collection

Cut Flowers by Babette Bloch, 2016, Stainless steel

Using laser-cut and water jet-cut stainless steel, Bloch challenges the limitations of metalwork. Her art seems organic and weightless, allowing for her natural themes to shine and reflect their surrounding environment. Through her use of story-telling, Bloch’s works expand on the landscapes that they exist within. The poetic transformation and reinvention of steel brings life to Bloch’s work on a larger than life scale.


The Fine Art Collection has been assembled through acquisitions, commissions, exhibitions, donations of art and other related visual arts programming.

Curated Projects

Curated programs are installed in various locations throughout the hospital system. Whether it’s a lobby, an administrative office, or patient areas, there is great care to select appropriate artwork for each space.

The program is conttinually adding to the collection as well as arworks for the ARTViews Galleries. For Artists: Montefiore is seeking to purchase original artwork for key public locations at multiple medical center locations. This call is open to all artists working and/or residing in the Bronx as well as the tri-state area (NY/NJ/CT).

The Art Program is also seeking seeking artwork for the ARTViews Gallery, and the Gallery in the Gardens, which are rotating exhibition spaces. The spaces  exhibit original artwork and is open to all artists living and/or working in the Bronx. The goal of the  rotating exhibition program  is to enrich the lives of the patients, caregivers, associates, students, faculty and the community’s understanding of contemporary art in a medical center context. See the website for more information on applying.

https://montefiorefineartprogram.squarespace.com/contact/

 


Innovation Lab Programs and New Experiences for Patients

In addition to these more traditional aspects of the art program of collecting and exhibitions, the Montetfiore is exploring new ways of working  with artists.

The truly innovative art programs that have been initiated at the Montfieore Medical Center are developments in Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality.

As Montefiore continues to advance state-of-the-art healthcare, the Fine Art Program brings patients the newest in digital technology to distract, minimize pain, and showcase contemporary art in a way never done before in a hospital setting.

The Augmented Reality Collection

Augmented Reality or AR, is the integration of digital information with the user’s environment in real time. Unlike virtual reality, which creates a totally artificial environment, augmented reality uses the existing environment and overlays new information on top of it.

Working with fine artists across the country, the AR Collection purchases and commissions artworks that exist only in AR. These pieces become a collection within a collection as patients can use their mobile devices to find a whole new world of art during their hospital experience.

The Virtual Reality Fine Art Program and Collection

The first of its kind to commission fine artists solely in virtual reality and for the benefit of patients. Working with the latest technology, the program seeks to replace opioids and pain with culturally enriched, site-specific experiences for our patients like never seen before.

Last year, the Montefiore’s Fine Arts Department received the Innovation in Healthcare Award from the annual Corporate Art Awards, sponsored by Luiss Business School in Rome.


Contact Information:  Jodi Moise, Curator,

Olivia Davis, Assistant Curator

Location  90 East 210th Street, Bronx, NY 10467

718-920-7671 ; 914.263.3685 cell
jmoise@montefiore.org

 

2016 © KEN SHUNG Laurel Porcari’s installation
We Are Stardust at Weiler Hospital (aka Einstein Hospital) in the Bronx, N.Y. commissioned by Jodi Moise ,Montefiore
The University Hospital for Albert Einstein College of Medicine  

Special Report Just Released: Copyright and Changing Legal Issues

The expansion of the  internet,……… the accompanying  proliferation of social media,….. the growing participation of businesses in the artworld,…… and many artists’ increased understanding of their rights to their intellectual property — have all been causing a re-evaluation of numerous laws and practices that conflict with each other in the status of copyrighted works, fair use,  freedom of panorama., and other areas. 

A new special report has just been prepared that outlines recent changes  in the status of artworks created for public  spaces, and private and corporate art collections.

The report is a useful guide for artists, art collectors, corporate art advisors, and anyone involved professionally in the artworld.

 

Some of the new legal situations  that are detailed in the report include:  

 

A new provision in the French Code of Intellectual Property.  Since October 2016, article L122-5 of the French Code  provides for a limited freedom of panorama for works of architecture and sculpture. The code authorizes “reproductions and representations of works of architecture and sculpture, placed permanently in public places and created by natural persons, with the exception of any usage of a commercial character”.

 

In the United States, on April 11, 2016, the US District Court for the Central District of California struck down the California Resale Royalties Act. California had been the only state that recognized royalty rights in favor of artists in cases when a work of art was re-sold. The ruling noted that the Calfornia Resale Royalties Act conflicted with the Copyright Act of 1976 with the “first sale doctrine”.

 

Sweden is testing the apparent conflict between Creative Commons and Freedom of Panorama in their country. In April 2016 the Swedish Supreme Court ruled that Wikimedia Sweden infringed on the copyright of artists of public artwork by creating a website and database of public artworks in Sweden, that contained images of public artwork uploaded by the public.

 

The European Commission has been attempting to harmonize the laws of Freedom of Panorama throughout all its member states. This will change the practices in virtually all of the countries to make them consistent with French and Italian laws.  This is a development that needs to be closely followed to understand its impact on all artists, especially photographers, and anyone working in the artworld.

 

These are some of the new laws that are affecting the copyright status of artworks in both private and public collections, and in public spaces.  Know about these new realities so you can protect yourself and your intellectual property !

 

Topics include:

  • Copyright and How it Affects Corporate Art Collections
  • History of Copyright Law
  • Works for Hire and their Copyright Status
  • Creative Commons
  • Fair Use in Copyright
  • Visual Artists Rights (VARA)
  • Freedom of Panorama
  • Photographing Works of Art in Public Locations – a changing reality
  • California Resale Royalties Act
  • Tax Issues on the Ownership of Art

 

This 50 page report is available in a pdf format for $7.00

You can order below by clicking on the Buy Now button, and it will be sent to you via WeTransfer when your payment has been credited.  Orders will be filled within 24 hours.

 

I would like to order the Special Report on the Changing Legal Issues in Copyright.  — published in January  2018 for $ 7.00 US$


Thank you for your interest in our publications and website.

Editor: Shrley Reiff Howarth

Can Art Change the World?

How art and artists can transform the world.

One of the most popular new works of art to emerge in recent weeks is the bronze Fearless Girl sculpture by Kristen Visval that has rapidly become a symbol and rallying point for the women’s movement.

It was placed on March 8 in Wall Street at the intersection of Broadway and Morris streets, to draw attention to gender inequality and the pay gap in the corporate world. The sculpture – which became an instant tourist draw, and has been seen by thousands of visitors to New York since it was installed — had been due to be removed on Sunday.

Now New York’s mayor Bill de Blasio has announced that the sculpture will stay in place at least until March next year.  The statue was “standing up to fear, standing up to power, being able to find in yourself the strength to do what’s right”, he added. “She is inspiring everyone at a moment when we need inspiration.”

The art work was commissioned by asset managers State Street Global Advisors (SSGA), who have stated that one in four of the 3,000 largest traded US companies did not have even one woman on their board and the company has said that the girl represented the future.

But this young girl has had a far wider and unexpected impact. It is being recognized as a symbol of the women’s movement and can be seen on many levels to represent the strength and courage of women around the world. Fearless Girl is something all women of any age, shape, color or creed can relate to.

The sculpture has been created by Kristen Visbal, an American sculptor who was born in Uraguay, and who now lives and works in Lewes, Delaware. She specializes in lost-wax casting in bronze. She attended the University of Arizona in Tucson. Her latest creation, Fearless Girl, is a 50-inch high (1,300 mm) bronze, installed on the Bowling Green in Manhattan’s Financial District.

According to Visbal, “The young girl says soft and sensitive equals strong and capable — The piece is pungent with Girl Power!”

In a March 8 press release she stated that “All women should relate to this work,” she wrote. “It should inspire the young to dream as if anything were possible and simultaneously encourage today’s working woman to hold her ground, no matter what challenges may come barreling down the pike.”

The piece was a collaboration with State Street Global Advisors and McCann New York in celebration of International Women’s Day, March 8, and Women’s History Month.

The Charging Bull sculpture was originally guerrilla art by Italian-born artist Arturo Di Modica. Installed in 1989, the bronze was meant to represent the “strength and power of the American people” in response to the market crash in 1987. But it become a popular attraction and was allowed to stay.

The impact of the Fearless Girl sculpture, and one that has not escaped anyone that sees it, lies in the fact that in spite of the confrontation by the iconic bull of Wall Street, the young girl braces herself and defiantly stands firm. As she faces off against the bull, she has become a potent symbol for the awakening strength in today’s international woman”s movement.

However, in an article on Artnet, a darker view of the story behind the sculpture is described.

In contrast, Fearless Girl, created by artist Kristen Visbal, is a carefully calculated play—some say a publicity stunt—by financial firm State Street Global Advisors (SSGA) and advertising firm McCann New York. As Nick Pinto put it at the Village Voice: “Too Bad That Statue of a Girl Staring Down the Wall Street Bull Is a PR Stunt by Wall Street Patriarchs.”

“As such, the work’s pro-women message is a bit tainted. Both companies are predominantly run by men: Hyperallergic crunched the numbers and found McCann’s leadership was only 27 percent female. SSGA was even worse at just 18 percent. The gender gap, the very thing The Fearless Girl appears to be fighting, is alive and well at the companies that brought her into being. “Could there possibly be anything more patronizing,” asked Hyperallergic’s Jillian Steinhauer, “than two massive, male-dominated capitalist companies installing a branded statue of the most conceivably non-threatening version of womankind in supposed honor of a day devoted to women’s equality that was founded by the Socialist Party?”

(See the complete Artnet article https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/fearless-girl-wall-street-art-installation-extended-904112?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=032817daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=from_&utm_term=artnet%20News%20-%20European%20List%20Only )

In my opinion however, it shows that art has a great impact and can change the world, sometimes in totally unexpected ways!

This non-threatening but courageous little girl has become a potent symbol for the women’s movement as it makes its own statement about the strength and courage of women in the face of aggression — no matter what the original intent was of the firm that commissioned it.

You can never predict how art may transform the world !

see other articles at:  Artnet

https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/fearless-girl-wall-street-art-installation-extended-904112?utm_campaign=artnetnews&utm_source=032817daily&utm_medium=email&utm_content=from_&utm_term=artnet%20News%20-%20European%20List%20Only

From the Cape Gazette, by Chris Flood, March 8, 2017.

http://www.capegazette.com/article/lewes%E2%80%99-kristen-visbal-creates-fearless-girl/128311

Fearless Girl was modeled and cast in two months, a process which typically takes six to eight months. The sculpture was cast in bronze at New Arts Foundry of Baltimore, Md.

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