Let’s Hit the Road Again — Experience the Era

Celebrating America’s love affair with the automobile — an exhibition and book for your car loving friends

Let’s Hit the Road Again, our new book and traveling exhibition explores the car’s impact on American life and society and  celebrates America’s love affair with the automobile. 

During the first decades of the 20th century, the automobile transformed the way we live.

For the first time, people  could now hop into their cars, hit the road and escape from the places and circumstances that bound them.  The car gave people freedom – freedom to travel, freedom to explore, freedom to experience new ways of living.


The automobile transformed America — where we live, how we work, how we travel, what the cities and suburbs look like, our environment – all have been profoundly shaped by the car.

In Let’s Hit the Road Again artists from around the world have recycled discarded metal wheel coverings and hubcaps  — and turned them into fascinating and sometimes controversial artworks.

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Take a  trip down memory lane and enjoy how 149 artists from the LandfillArt Collection  have celebrated this unique era .

……… As long as art has existed, some of it has pushed people to look beyond their comfort zones …….  And this book and exhibition will  open your eyes a little wider.

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Artists have long used junkyards and trash heaps as source material.  By taking something discarded, they turned it into something beautiful, compelling or provocative.

The artists represented in the LandfillArt Collection,  have become a community encouraging and supporting the creative reuse and recycling of the earth’s resources.   The artists have explored the potential of re-using materials –   in their hands, workroom scraps, broken dishes, and even recycled paint have become art.  They have turned the ordinary into the extraordinary!

With such a diversity of creative expressions and mediums, the artists created a body of work, that makes us pause, ponder, and plan to make a difference in our own world.

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The following are a few of the surprises and stories that await you in Let’s Hit the Road Again

Title of Artwork: Route 66 Revisited, by Thom Roslan

The book explores the lore and popular culture that surrounds some of the iconic cars, and the well- known highways and byways.  Several highways became outright legends on their own. 

Often called “The Mother Road,” Route 66 became one of the most famous roads in the US.  It originally ran from Chicago, before ending in Santa Monica in Los Angeles County, California, covering a total of 2,448 miles (3,940 km). 

US 66 served as a primary route for those who migrated west, especially during the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, and the road supported the economies of the communities it passed through.

It was recognized in popular culture by both the hit song “Get Your Kicks on Route 66” and  the Route 66 television show in the 1960s. The song “Get your kicks on Route 66.”became a monument to long-distance car travel..

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Highway 61 North –  known as the “Blues Highway,” rivaled Route 66 as the most famous road in American music lore.  It was a major transit route out of the Deep South particularly for African Americans traveling north to Chicago, St Louis and Memphis.

The highway has a long musical history, being the supposed location where singer-songwriter Robert Johnson made a deal with the Devil for his successes.  The road later gave its name to Minnesota native Bob Dylan’s album Highway 61 Revisited.

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At its height, one in every six working Americans worked directly for the automobile industry, and Detroit was its epicenter.

Henry Ford in his own words……

“If I had asked people what they wanted, they would have said faster horses.”

“Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.”

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Cars of the Stars.   The high end automobiles, such as the Cadillac and Mercedes, became status symbols and were popular with celebrities, and  Hollywood stars. 

By 1910, Cadillac was the first manufacturer to mass-produce cars with enclosed cabins.  They invented climate control.  By 1964, everything on your Caddy could be controlled by thermostat, the first vehicle to ever offer such a cool ride.

The fascinating story behind Al Capone’s infamous getaway car – a Cadillac – that was custom built for him.   The gangster commissioned several armoured cars, but the most famous was a 1928 Cadillac – and thought to be one of the first cars to have body armour and bulletproof glass.

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The Pierce-Arrow was a status symbol, owned by many Hollywood stars and celebrities.  Most of the royalty of the world had at least one Pierce-Arrow in its collection. 

Actor Sessue Hayakawa, from the film Bridge on the River Kwai, drove a custom-ordered gold-plated Pierce-Arrow.

In 1909, U.S. President William Howard Taft ordered two Pierce-Arrows to be used for state occasions.

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Many television celebrities were used in car marketing. 

One of the most successful was Dinah Shore .  She was one of the first television celebrities whose name became synonymous with a product   — and during the 50s and early 60s, she was probably most responsible for putting Chevrolet automobiles in the driveways of millions. 

On her TV show she sang “the Chevy jingle” and the song became an anthem for the era; a tune approaching patriotic status.  By 1962-63 Chevy sales alone were more than 2 million a year, and all of the General Motors in those years amounted to half of all vehicles sold in the U.S.

Groucho Marx was another who became identified with a car make.  DeSoto sponsored the popular television game show You Bet Your Life from 1950 – 1958, in which host Groucho Marx urged viewers to visit a DeSoto dealer with the phrase “tell ’em Groucho sent you“, and to “drive a DeSoto before you decide“.  The DeSoto was named for Hernando de Soto to symbolize travel, adventure and pioneering.

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Title of Artwork: Chief, by James Dobney

Why Does Pontiac use an Indian as their symbol.   The earliest Pontiac logos, show a side view of a Native American with a distinctive headdress.  

Pontiac,  or Obwandiyag (c. 1720 – 1769) was an Odawa war chief who led Native Americans in a struggle against British military occupation of the Great Lakes region. 

Pontiac’s War began in May 1763 when Pontiac and 300 followers attempted to take Fort Detroit by surprise.  They laid siege to the fort, where they were joined by more than 900 warriors from a half-dozen tribes.

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Title:  Chevy to the Levee, By Guinotte Wise

America’s love affair with the automobile was most evident in the music of the era.  

The Day Music Died …. 

So bye-bye, Miss American Pie, Drove my Chevy to the levee, but the levee was dry And them good old boys were drinkin’ whiskey and rye Singin’ “This’ll be the day that I die, This’ll be the day that I die.”   

Chevy to the levee” is from  “American Pie,” which topped America’s music charts in 1972. Singer and songwriter Don McLean wrote it to mourn the death of three musicians in a 1959 airplane crash. Those who perished the “day the music died” included Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens, and Jiles Perry Richardson Jr., “the Big Bopper.” The song’s familiar chorus is now part of American pop culture.

“Oh, Lord, won’t you buy me a Mercedes Benz.”  –Janis Joplin

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The Volkswagen Beetle is arguably the most recognized industrial product shape ever produced.

But more than that, it has endured for generations, becoming a part of many families’ cultural history.

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The Jeep

The Jeep is the oldest four-wheel drive mass-production vehicles now known as SUVs.

“You know it’s important to have a Jeep in Los Angeles. That front wheel drive is crucial when it starts to snow on Rodeo Drive.” –Christopher Guest

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Tail Fins and the Designers

With America’s passion for the jet age in the 1950s, the public was obsessed with the need to go fast. 

During the 1960s American automobiles came to resemble the jet with it’s tail fins.  Large tailfins,  designs reminiscent of rockets, and radio antennas that imitated Sputnik were common, due to the efforts of design pioneers such as Harley Earl.  So before the 1950s and 1960s were over,  designers were adding fins to every car they could.

“Dad called General Motors designer Harley Earl’s designs “chrome-plated barges,” .. he said that, if left to his own devices, Harley Earl would put fins on a TV or refrigerator.”   Raymond Loewy

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Vision of the Future

Frank Lloyd Wright had three loves:   cars, architecture and the American landscape.  His annual road trips to Taliesin helped him refresh his architectural perspectve and vision.  And gave him a clear view of the country’s changing landscape, and how automobiles were transforming American society.

In his architectural projects, he designed many car-influenced  structures that included a filling station, a self-service parking garage, a “paradise on wheels housing project,” and, of course, his Jaguar showroom in New York City.

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If you would like a digital pdf copy of the entire 180 page book, you can order it here for $9.95, by clicking on the button below that will take you to paypal. When your payment is credited, I will then send you the pdf via wetransfer.

Thank you for your interest




Book Title: Lets Hit the Road Again
Book Title:  Lets Hit the Road AgainAuthor: Shirley Reiff Howarth
184 pages, 230 illustrations
ISBN: 978–0–943488-27-1 Paperback
ISBN: 978–0–943488-26-4 Hardbound
Published in the United States of America
Book layout and design ©2019 The Humanities Exchange / Shirley Reiff Howarth
Website: : www.humanities-exchange.org
email:  exhibitions@humanities-exchange.orgAvailable from The Humanities Exchange,  Shirley Reiff Howarth,
2840 West Bay Drive, # 250, Belleair Bluffs, Florida 33770
Copies can be ordered from the Humanities Exchange website at:
http://humanities-exchange.org/

Quantity sales. Special discounts are available on quantity purchases by corporations,  associations, and others. For details, contact the address above.

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You can see a full 180 page preview, with over 230 photographs by clicking on the photograph below: Order single copies of the softbound or hardbound book from the preview by clicking on the shopping cart at the top of the preview page


Let’s Hit the Road Again

By Shirley Reiff Howarth

 

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Multple copies are available at a discount price: over 10 copies with a 30% ciscount, and over 20 copies for a 40% discount — contact me for an invoice and shipping costs — publications@humanities-exchange.org

* * * *

If you would like a digital pdf copy of the entire 180 page book, you can order it here for $9.95, by clicking on the button below that will take you to paypal. When your payment is credited, I will then send you the pdf via wetransfer.

Thank you for your interest




Book Title: Lets Hit the Road Again

Author: Shirley Reiff Howarth
184 pages, 230 illustrations
ISBN: 978–0–943488-27-1 Paperback
ISBN: 978–0–943488-26-4 Hardbound
Published in the United States of America
Book layout and design ©2019 The Humanities Exchange / Shirley Reiff Howarth
Website: : www.humanities-exchange.org
email: exhibitions@humanities-exchange.org

Available from The Humanities Exchange, Shirley Reiff Howarth,
2840 West Bay Drive, # 250, Belleair Bluffs, Florida 33770
Copies can be ordered from the Humanities Exchange website at:
http://humanities-exchange.org/

Quantity sales. Special discounts are available on quantity purchases by corporations, associations, and others. For details, contact the address above.

Title: Sky High and Riding Low, by Susan Hammond

“I pesently own a Chrysler 300, and each time I drive to work in New York City I pass the beautiful Chrysler Building  I chose to create a hubcap showing antique Chryslers as well as the historic Chrysler Building.”   — Susan Hammond

 

An “Art Exhibition” at 38,000 Feet

A New Art Project for Qantas.

Wunala Dreaming. This design appeared on a jet on September 3, 1994 for the opening of Osaka’s Kansai Airport. Photo: YSSYguy, Wikipedia

Perhaps Corporate Art Brief readers are already familiar with the art project Qantas initiated during the 1990s to paint several of their planes with aboriginal designs to celebrate the 1993 International Year of the World’s Indigenous People.

Editor Note:  More information about this project is available in the 2017 edition of the International Directory of Corporate Art Collections. Ordering information is here

The company, the national airline of Australia, has continued to initiate innovative ways of sharing the work of Australian artists with an international audience. The latest project has been to work with some of Australia’s leading artists, photographers and digital influencers to feature their work on the airline’s international Business class amenity kits.

The project, called ‘Qantas Curates’ collaborates with professional Australian contemporary art curators to select artworks from 16 Australians that work in different styles that include pop culture, photography, fine art, abstract landscape, Indigenous art and textile design.

On May 1, the new range of amenity kits (eight types for men and eight for women) were introduced and offered to Business class customers on international flights, with two designs launching every few months.

According to Olivia Wirth, of Marketing & Corporate Affairs for Qantas Group the airline’s vision was to increase an awareness of contemporary Australian art and give travellers a collectible piece to take with them.

As the national carrier, we’re pleased to support talented Aussies telling uniquely Australian stories through their artwork and share them with a global audience.  We know amenity kits are an important part of the international Business class experience. Customers love the functionality of our kits and many use them after their flight as make-up bags, an evening clutch or to carry their mobile phones. So, the exposure is broad.”

The first two artists to be featured were Jacob Leary and Liam Snootle

Bubblegum Dystopia by Jacob Leary.   “Bubblegum Dystopia extends my interests into the nature of organisation. Focusing on the idea of non-linearity the picture space attempts to explore the layered complexities that define contemporary modes of experience.”

Liam Snootle – No Queen Blues/Unwind

 

Billie Justice Thomson, whose artwork Fairy Bread will feature on a kit for women said she was proud to be part of a program that showcases artwork in such a unique way. “It’s really exciting to be part of an art exhibition at 38,000 feet. “

A full list of the 16 artists is at the end of the article.

For many years, Qantas has been giving Australian artists opportunities to reach global audiences. In 2015, a donation of AUD 2.75 million ($1.9 million) from the Qantas Foundation, the airline’s philanthropic foundation, has enabled the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia (MCA) and the Tate to launch a joint acquisition program for contemporary Australian art. Works acquired as part of the program will be jointly owned and displayed by the MCA and the Tate. The institutions are planning to buy a wide variety of art spanning from the late 1960s to the present, and in a coordinated selection and purchasing strategy, the museums will share resources and expertise to carefully select an exciting group of artworks which will be shown in a special exhibition at the MCA in 2016, before traveling to London for a show at the Tate. Introducing contemporary Australian art to an international audience is meant to draw more attention to artists who, in an international context, have often been overlooked.

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 Announcement:  The story behind Qantas’ painted planes is being featured in our upcoming publication, as well as the Alexander Calder plane design  project of Braniff Airways and many other fascinating art projects around the world.  The book:  Unlikely Bedfellows:  Art Changing the Workplace and Industry will be released on June 1 in a digital and paperback edition.  I am accepting advance orders and an announcement will be posted shortly.  In the meantime, send me an email if you are interested in more information.  corporate.directory@earthlink.net

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These are the 16 artists that are being featured on the Amenity kits:

Jacob Leary – Bubblegum Dystopia features on the kit for women onboard 1 May 2017
Liam Snootle – No Queen Blues/Unwind features on the kit for men onboard 1 May 2017
Billie Justice Thomson – Fairy Bread
Bonnie and Neil – Gypsy Floral
Craig & Karl – Home
Fred Fowler – 7000 Ironbarks
Jon Campbell – Maaate
Kate Banazi – Adas’ Algorithm
Lucy Simpson – Dhina
Luke Shadbolt – North Avoca ECL 2016
Megan Weston – Iceland
Myra Yurtiwa Cooke (dec) – Lirrun
Nicole Warne – Hamilton Island 2014
Polly Pawuya Butler-Jackson – Mobile Phone Tower
Rachel Castle – I Love the people
Tom Blachford – Black Water

 

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Editor’s Choice: The 18 Best Corporate Art Collections of 2017

Here is our selection of this year’s 18 best Corporate Art Programs around the world.

From an analysis  of the 700+  programs described in the latest edition of the 2017 International Directory of Corporate Art Collections . . .

Our 2017 selection is based on how the corporate art program is managed – how the art is being exhibited and featured, if it is accessible for viewing, are there education programs for employees and how active is the participation. In other words, is the art program part of the fabric of the company’s mission and has the art become part of the employee’s lives.

There are over 700 art programs that are described in the International Directory of Corporate Art Collections, and many include works of works of unparalleled rarity or importance in the history of art …… But often these are installed in private museums or viewing areas. The collection may be a source of pride and prestige for the company, but it does little to affect the people working in the company and their environment, and has virtually no impact on the workplace or community.  Our selection is based on the way the art programs have been integrated and the art is viewed.

Because in the final analysis, that is the purpose of fine art – to be seen and appreciated — not just held as an investment, hidden away in board rooms and blocked from being viewed except by a handful of people. Art is a global language that builds bridges between people, and stimulates creative and critical thinking. It awakens the imagination and intellect, and allows employees to better communicate with each other with new insights and ideas. It goes beyond the pictorial, and truly challenges the mind.

So our list of the 18 Best are those art programs that have been supporting the creation and appreciation of art in the workplace and in the community – whether it is regional, national or worldwide. The companies selected have successfully accomplished this goal. They have made art a part of the lives of those that work there, as well as those that visit the company and through its integration into and support of the surrounding community.

Some of the criteria that have been considered in our selection are the following:

Employees: can employees relate to the collection and are they learning about the art through educational programs.

Accessibility: is the collection accessible for viewing by visitors and the public through tours or self-guided visits

Publications:  are there published catalogues or information on line about what is in the collection.

Loans and Exhibitions: are the artworks available for loans to one-man or museum exhibitions, or does the company organize exhibitions from their collection for tour

Community: are there community education programs, artist-in-residence programs, or support for the arts projects, for example in conservation, art competition awards, regional exhibitions, museum sponsorships, etc.

Consistency: is there a consistent integrated philosophy behind the collection or is the management subject to changes in the economy or business interests

So here are our picks for the 18 Best Corporate Art Programs Around the World in alphabetical order

Banners by Norman Catherine, Medium: Tufted wool, 20m x 1.8m, © Absa, Norman Catherine

ABSA, South Africa

One of South Africa’s largest financial institutions, ABSA is an amalgamation of four financial institutions that took place in the early 1990s. Today, Absa is a highly reputed financial institution on the African continent, whose parent company is Barclays PLC.   The Absa art collection is extensive, consisting of just under 20,000 artworks. The majority of the collection is South African,with artworks dating back to the early 1900s, and it provides a narrative of the evolution of the visual arts in South Africa from the turn of the last century until today. In some cases there may be up to 40 works by key artists. The majority are displayed in offices and reception areas, and there is an art gallery in the head office.

When Absa Towers North was built in 1999, the major artworks were commissioned at the same time, and this architect/artist collaboration ensured the successfully integrated visual impact. Two merit award prizes are also offered; a two-month residency on the island of Sylt, the northernmost island in Germany, and a one-month residency in New York through the Ampersand Foundation.  Through the Absa Gallery, exhibitions are given to artists and young curators trying to make their careers and build their reputations in the visual arts. They are invited to curate a show in the Absa Gallery. For the past 28 years, Absa has been sponsoring the Absa L’Atelier Art Competition in partnership with the South African National Association for the Visual Arts. The competition is open to young and emerging artists aged 21 through to 35. The prize includes a cash component, a three- to six-month residency in a studio apartment in the Cité  Internationale des Arts in Paris, and a solo exhibition in the Absa Gallery.

AXA, France – Germany

A French-owned insurance company, AXA operates around the world. Its art program has three elements: collecting;  conserving and working with museums.   AXA has contributed €48.3 million over the last nine years to safeguarding French heritage, and has enriched public collections with numerous masterpieces. Conservation has been a recurring theme in the company’s activities worldwide.

There art collection in Germany, AXA Konzern AG, was initiated in the mid-1980s and now consists of some 3,200 works by more than 1,200 artists working in a wide range of media and the artworks are displayed throughout the company’s  buildings. AXA supports many exhibitions and art fairs including Art Basel Miami in 2006, and the company has an active conference and cultural event program for its employees.

The exhibition ‘Great Masters of Folk Art of Iberoamérica’ in 2012 in Palacio de Cultura Banamex, Palace of Iturbide, Centro Histórico, Mexico City. Photograph: Arturo González de Alba, Fomento Cultural Banamex, AC

 

Banamex, Mexico

Over 4,000 examples of Mexican art and artifacts from colonial to the present. All media are represented including buildings, folk art and furniture. As the oldest private bank in Mexico, Banamex is part of the worldwide Citibank financial network, but the art collection is administered by the Fomento Cultural Banamex, a non-profit affiliate founded in 1971 to purchase and exhibit art, and promote and protect the artistic heritage of Mexico.

Banamex has preserved several historically important colonial buildings – Casas de Cultura Banamex – such as the Palace of Iturbide, the Casa del Diezmo in Morelia, the palace of the count of the Suchil Valley in Durango, the Casa de Montejo in Mérida, and the home of the Majorat of Cane in San Miguel de Allende. The Palace of Iturbide houses temporary exhibitions and a permanent museum and also has a library, educational workshops, consultation, and video and multimedia rooms.

Banamex has concentrated efforts in the rescue of Mexico’s folk art through programs that encourage and strengthen practices. The folk art collection includes work by 2,500 Mexican artisans from each of Mexico’s 31 states, with 21 indigenous cultures represented. The program provides support for artisans and collects, preserves and promotes folk art. Activities also includes the recovery of the original design, and on urban improvement – comprising the remodeling of facades, as well as educational programs and outreach.

Education program and tour for Banco Santander

Banco Santander, Spain

The Fundación Banco Santander is a private institution with a cultural commitment that forms part of the policy of corporate social responsibility of the Santander Bank. Among its  projects, the Foundation manages, conserves and promotes Santander’s art collection, organises exhibitions and lectures, supports educational programs related to the arts, and contributes to the heritage of the world through its activities with museums and cultural institutions.

The art covers centuries, with works by El Greco, Van Dyck, Tintoretto, Rusiñol, Miro, Picasso, Chillida and Serra among others. . The company recently moved its headquarters, with some 8,000 staff, to Santander City near Madrid and included a 3,000-square-metre art gallery in its design. There is a website and a book about the collection, and it is represented on Google’s online Art Project.

CaixaForum in Barcelona. Photograph: Olga Planas Jiménez. © Fundación La Caixa

La Caixa, Spain

One of the leading art programs in the world, La Caixa Foundation is based in the bank’s headquarters in Barcelona. The large institution sponsors a great variety of programs and its activities contribute to the heritage of Spain.

La Caixa Foundation has different collections; among them are two public ones and the rest of the collections are internal — In total there are around 9,500 works of art.

The Art at Work program has several collections formed throughout the last 100 years. These works hang in the offices and workplaces of the staff. Plans include a joint venture with MACBA, the Museum of Contemporary Art of Barcelona, which will lead to joint projects between a private collection and a public one. The resulting educational activities will reinforce the existing work of La Caixa Foundation.

The company has created the concept of cultural centers in architecturally important buildings, including a converted 1912 factory in Barcelona and a purpose-built Caixa Forum in Madrid. There are Caixa Forums in Lleida, Tarragona and Girona, with plans for more.

Clifford Chance, United Kingdom

Clifford Chance activities are modeled on museum practices, and an associated program promotes and supports the printmaking community. There is a dedicated art intranet site for the staff, with in-house lectures and exhibitions, exhibition guided tours, ten-minute discussions and ‘Meet the Artist’ sessions offered to the 700-plus members of its Art Club. The firm sponsors local community art organizations, such as PhotoVoice and Autograph, as well as running postgraduate printmaking and sculpture awards, and it welcomes artists-in-residence.

Deutsche Bank, Germany

Started more than 30 years ago, the art collection of 56,000 works by around 5,000 artists, concentrates on the medium of paper including photography.. Deutsche Bank’s Group Head Office in Frankfurt houses works by more than 120 young artists from all continents, and nearly 90 per cent of all the works in the collection are on view in more than 900 Deutsche Bank locations worldwide and in exhibitions or on loan to 28 museums. 600 masterworks are on permanent loan to the Städel Museum. Exhibitions have toured Europe, the US and South America The current focus of collecting is on emerging artists from all over the world, with an emphasis on South America, Africa and Asia.

To promote young artists the Deutsche Bank and its Foundations have initiated several art prizes.The Artist of the Year award, which was founded in 2010, is devoted entirely to introducing the public to an engagement with new art. Employees of Deutsche Bank are offered a wide range of programs, including selecting work for their environment and taking part in tours and talks about the collection. There is a comprehensive website and a variety of catalogues of the collection.

Itaú Unibanco

Itau Unibanco, Bazil

This Brazilian bank is among the 10 largest financial institutions in the world. In 1987 it founded the Itaú Cultural Institute, an independent non-profit organization devoted to the development of emerging Brazilian artists. The Institute is also responsible for managing the art collection of 12,000 works that begin chronologically, with the first documents and iconography from the Portuguese colonial era of the 16th century. These works make up the Brasiliana Collection. Many of the works are located in the company’s headquarters and can be viewed in the general public areas and in temporary exhibitions.

Since the collection makes a significant contribution to the history of Brazilian art up to the present day, the ongoing plan for the future is to acquire works that will fill in gaps in the collection.  Staff is involved through an intranet and guided tours, and works are loaned to museums, some of which have sponsorship. The Rumos Project organises community-education programs. There are three books on the art programs and a website.

Monte dei Paschi di Siena, Italy

It is believed the collection started in 1481 when Benvenuto di Giovanni del Guasta was commissioned to paint Our Lady of Mercy, making it the oldest corporate art program, and certainly one of the best examples of a contribution to the heritage of Sienese art.

The Bank’s art program rests on a magnificent collection of over 27,600 works of art including paintings, drawings, lithographs, sculpture and fine furniture, dating from the 14th century to the 20th century. In addition there are a further 1,851 works belonging to the Chigi Saracini Collection which is also owned by the bank and displayed in Chigiana Music Academy.

The core of the collection constitutes Sienese works from the 14th to the 17th century. In the 20th century, the bank has continued the spirit of patronage and the resulting works are located in offices in Siena and the rest of Italy. Through its acquisition of other banks the company has broadened the collection The collection is extensively catalogued and guided tours are offered to the museum and other works can be viewed by appointment. Given the importance of the collection, the company has organized and supported many important exhibitions and loans to museums.

J P Morgan Chase, United States

The JPMorgan Chase art program oversees more than 30,000 objects in 450 corporate offices around the globe. Modern and contemporary painting, sculpture, works on paper and photography continue to be the collection’s strength.

The collection has grown through the merger of several different corporate collections that included Chemical Bank, The First National Bank of Chicago and Chase Manhattan Bank, among others. Perhaps the most renowned part of the collection has its roots in the former collection of the Chase Manhattan Bank established by David Rockefeller in 1959. By integrating artwork with the architecture of new buildings and incorporating an enlightened approach to acquisitions, this forerunner of the modern corporate collection became a model for other companies, particularly in North America.

The JPMorgan Chase has an active museum loan program, originates traveling exhibitions, provides educational programming for internal and external audiences and supports the company’s worldwide philanthropic and sponsorship activities. The bank believes that arts and culture are the lifeblood of vibrant communities, so the wide range of programs and events foster creativity, provide access to the arts to under-served audiences, promote self-expression and celebrate diversity.

Samsung, Ho-Am Museum and Heewon. Photograph: HyunSoo Kim © Ho-Am Art Museum

Samsung, South Korea

Certainly one of the most impressive in the world, Samsung’s dynamic art program has created the Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art; the Ho-Am Art Museum; and PLATEAU; as well as many other cultural and artistic activities, and academic research.The mission of the Samsung Foundation of Culture, established in 1965, is to preserve and promote the achievements of traditional Korean arts, while supporting emerging and established artists in all media and enriching the country’s cultural landscape.

The Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art opened in 2004 and is the only art institution in Korea where visitors can appreciate works of art ranging from Korean traditional art to international contemporary art – all in one location. It consists of two buildings designed by Mario Botta and Jean Nouvel, along with the innovative Samsung Child Education and Culture Center designed by Rem Koolhaas, which architecturally reinterpret traditional art and international art and compose a multifunction art space. The diversified educational programs include lectures, family workshops, teachers’ programs and tours.  The Ho Am Art Museum opened in April 1982, and this private museum was founded as the permanent home for traditional Korean works of art collected over about three decades. Formerly known as the Rodin Gallery, the PLATEAU, has become one of the central institutions in the Korean contemporary art scene.

Saxo Bank, Denmark

One of Saxo Bank’s core values is ‘Pride’ – pride in one’s job, one’s accomplishments and one’s employer. The bank’s investment in and commitment to innovative architecture, design and visual arts have been central to this goal. As a natural extension of this, Saxo Bank has created a working environment that is welcoming and inspiring.  After completing its impressive and award-winning design by 3XN architects, in 2008, Saxo Bank began assembling a striking new collection of art that has become one of the largest and most significant corporate art collections in Denmark.  The architecture of its head office in Copenhagen takes Saxo Bank’s cutting-edge profile as its point of departure. In its impressive central atrium, visitors can see several floors of artworks, readily visible from different angles in the immense space.

The Bank has a tradition of sponsorship activities and supports initiatives in arts and literature. In addition to publishing special editions of books that have had a profound cultural influence, Saxo Bank also sponsors innovative artistic projects that stimulate discussion as well as entertain. Saxo Bank believes that art – including fine art, music, literature etc – is the barometer of a culture and that it makes it possible for all individuals to reach their personal goals. Through a comprehensive website, the artworks in the bank’s head office in Copenhagen can be viewed as a virtual visit.

Société Générale, France

The art program began in 1995 when the company moved its 13,000 employees into a new headquarters in La Défense, Paris. It has collected over 1,000 works — 350 paintings, sculptures and photographs, with the remainder being limited-edition original prints. The focus of the collection is artworks by both emerging and established artists.

The company has an active art program for employees that includes an art club with about 600 members, and regular exhibitions with curators, conferences, art days, and educational activities plus a staff photography competition. The art program also features an excellent website, a catalogue of the collection and a significant budget for additions to the collection. Société Générale art program has an emphasis on working with young and older children and students. . The collection is open to all young people with creative documentation and games for the youngest ones to discover contemporary art.

The museum is on the top floor of Sompo’s headquarters in Tokyo, Japan

Sompo, Japan

The Seiji Togo, Yasuda Kaisai Museum of Art, forerunner of the present Seiji Togo Memorial Sompo Japan Museum of Art, opened in 1976 when the company included the purpose-built museum on the 42nd floor of its new headquarters in Shinjuku,Tokyo. The museum has developed many exhibitions and educational programs for the staff and children, and the museum is open to the public. Loans are made to other museums and the Foundation also sponsors and provides a number of awards. There are a series of catalogues, an excellent website, and a book about the collection. Sompo Japan makes a major contribution to art heritage in Japan.

Telenor, Norway

Telenor’s art collection features international and Nordic contemporary art, andr has been collecting works since 1998. In September 2002, Telenor ASA officially opened its new Fornebu headquarters, designed by architect Scott Wyatt. The company budgeted £3.55 million for artistic decoration, viewed as essential aspects of the new building. The complex has a unified design, while each block and building has its own distinguishing features. Some of the artists who were commissioned to create site-specific sculptures or artistic decorations included Daniel Burén, Jenny Holzer and Richard Wright.

Art, architecture and design are an integral part of Telenor’s work environment. Telenor creates its own cultural concepts and stages its own productions, bringing together musicians, artists and performers from all over the world. The Telenor Culture Programme has been acquiring a more international profile. In 2007, eighty-six concerts were organised. and Norway, Russia, Montenegro, Thailand, Hungary and Ukraine have all enjoyed concerts staged by the Culture Program. Since 1995, the Telenor International Culture Prize, has given awards for outstanding performances in music, film, literature, visual or performing arts..

Telkom, South Africa

A history of contemporary art in South Africa can’t escape the very politicized socio-economic conditions under which South Africans have lived. The Telkom Art Collection shows work by a range of artists representing different aspects of the spectrum in terms of personal circumstances and opportunities within the recent and local past.  Part of Telkom’s business philosophy is a passion for the preservation of the country’s unique artistic heritage. The Art Collection promotes South African art in collaboration with partners in the arts that includes individual artists, academics, community based art organizations and industry bodies such as Business and Arts South Africa (BASA).

Telkom employees’ children participate in paper-making workshop facilitated by Phumani Paper on 29 August 2009.

The art collection is displayed in Telkom buildings, and the gallery at the company’s headquarters in Pretoria showcases the artworks and other art-related projects. The collection also runs art education programmes for employees and their families. These include workshops on printmaking, paper recycling and making crafts from waste, as well as art therapy workshops, lunchtime talks and exhibitions. Since 2002, hundreds of Telkom shareholders, employees and their children have explored and experienced different art forms at hands-on art workshops. In addition to sponsoring exhibitions,Telkom was also involved in Artists in Conversation, where previously untold stories about South Africa’s artistic heritage have been brought to light through the oral history project. In addition to work by contemporary artists, the collection also includes work by three special areas, unique to South Africa:

USIKO artworks: Rural-based artists were commissioned to re-create indigenous beadwork from over 150 years ago.

Proudly African Ceramics: Ardmore ceramics, started in 1985 and showing the integration of traditional cultural skills with the advantages of Western technology, has led to the development of a unique art form.

Bead Art: Czech glass beads were imported and a 1.8m x 1.2m replica of the South African national flag was created by 12 skilled traditional bead workers. brought in from the Zulu homelands. Using 438,000 beads, the flag is one of the largest beaded items made in South Africa.

UBS, Switzerland

UBS has a rich history of actively collecting art and supporting artistic endeavours around the world, focusing on promotion, collection and educational activities in contemporary art. The bank’s impressive art collection of over 35,000 objects includes thousands of contemporary works by some of the newest emerging talents as well as some of the most important artists of the last 50 years.The comprehensive art program includes a global partnership with the Solomon R Guggenheim Foundation, launched in April 2012, and long-standing commitments to the international art fairs Art Basel, Art Basel Miami Beach and Art Basel Hong Kong.

The UBS Arts Forum enhances the experience of contemporary art with internationally recognised authorities from all fields of the contemporary art scene, such as artists, institutions and markets. Some of the topics covered have been The Art of Collecting; Changing China: New Perspectives on Contemporary Art; Art Houses, Art Structures, Art Institution; Global Players: Stakeholders in the Art World

Through its Culture Foundation, UBS promotes the advancement of cultural activities and artistic creativity, communication and exchange between artists and society, and the diversity of cultural expression. The Foundation supports Swiss artists, foreign artists with permanent residence in Switzerland, cultural projects by professionals that focus on Switzerland as well as the acquisition of significant works by art or cultural-historical museums in Switzerland.

Unicredit, Austria

As a result of the merger of several Italian banks and the addition of Bank Austria and Germany’s HVB, the art program of UniCredit, encompassing a selection of over 60,000 works of art, is noted for its commitment to culture over time, with art that spans from ancient artefacts to works by Old Masters and modern masters. In 2004 the emphasis of the art program evolved to focus on contemporary art. UniCredit’s excellent exhibition program has been developed to include artists from many countries in Eastern Europe (Russia, Austria, Poland, Turkey and Germany). The evolving website features a virtual tour, and numerous catalogues have been published. Many artworks can be seen by the public through tours and displays in public areas of the bank’s premises. The art program’s community activities include working with art fairs such as Artissima. There are several UniCredit programs. ‘Art at work’, displaying the artworks in the main branches and offices of the group. UniCredit is committed to supporting the cultural and artistic expressions of the territories in which it operates

Further information about these art programs is available in the latest edition of the International Directory of Corporate Art Collections..  You can order it now at a 30% discount by clicking  here

 

 

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