Artists: Attract New Buyers and Exhibitions

Corporations and business are  the most important buyers in the art market,  and they continue to have a major impact on sales and exhibitions throughout  the artworld

During  the past 50 years of documenting trends in the  corporate art world,  I have seen how it has  grown, retreated, and grown again like a phoenix, and has become transformed in the process each time.

Today companies have become more sophisticated and subtle in using art to enhance their company’s image, and it is being used in the workplace to stimulate creative thinking and out-of-the-box solutions


But how do they make their buying decision?  …. whether you are an artist, art gallery, art consultant, auction house, or museum, you need to understand how companies decide.

You need to know how to reach the right people, decide which companies to contact, and understand how they make their collecting decisions.  The 2020 Edition of the Directory and the ebook “Insiders Guide” will do this for you.

The ebook and Directory provide the two key research tools that will give you the ability to attrack more buyers and reach new audiences.


The 2020 Edition of Directory of Corporate Art Collections has been updated and is available for a 30% Pre-Publication Discount until February 1

……..it is simply the best source of information for what is happening with art in business and the workplace

And the only source of information about nearly 700 companies and businesses around the world, that are buying art, displaying art in un-traditional spaces, commissioning art, sponsoring art, and becoming partners with artists to create new ways to bring art into communities and people’s lives.

The International Directory highlights information on over 700 art programs in workplaoce settings and non-traditional spaces. This includes corporations, small businesses, partnerships, corporate foundations, airports, municipal transport and metro networks, cruise ships, hotels, and hospitals. 

40 additional corporate collections have been added to this edition, and the existing information has been updated and expanded

See sample pages here


Also included when you purchase the Directory is a free copy of the ebook, the  “Insider’s Guide to Art in the Workplace

This eBook reveals how a corporate curator thinks, how they make their decisions, and how the corporations run their art programs, It is a synthesis of the insights I’ve gained during the past 50 years  of being involved in the world of corporate art.

 

 

For ordering information for the 30% discount please go here

or contact the Editor at pubications@humanities-exchange.org.

What You Need to Know: Copyright and Changing Legal Issues

The expansion of the  internet,……… the accompanying  proliferation of social media,….. the growing participation of businesses in the artworld,…… and many artists’ increased understanding of their rights to their intellectual property — have all been causing a re-evaluation of numerous laws and practices that conflict with each other in the status of copyrighted works, fair use,  freedom of panorama., and other areas. 

A new special report has just been prepared that outlines recent changes  in the status of artworks created for public  spaces, and private and corporate art collections.

The report is a useful guide for artists, art collectors, corporate art advisors, and anyone involved professionally in the artworld.

 

Some of the new legal situations  that are detailed in the report include:  

 

A new provision in the French Code of Intellectual Property.  Since October 2016, article L122-5 of the French Code  provides for a limited freedom of panorama for works of architecture and sculpture. The code authorizes “reproductions and representations of works of architecture and sculpture, placed permanently in public places and created by natural persons, with the exception of any usage of a commercial character”.

 

In the United States, on April 11, 2016, the US District Court for the Central District of California struck down the California Resale Royalties Act. California had been the only state that recognized royalty rights in favor of artists in cases when a work of art was re-sold. The ruling noted that the Calfornia Resale Royalties Act conflicted with the Copyright Act of 1976 with the “first sale doctrine”.

 

Sweden is testing the apparent conflict between Creative Commons and Freedom of Panorama in their country. In April 2016 the Swedish Supreme Court ruled that Wikimedia Sweden infringed on the copyright of artists of public artwork by creating a website and database of public artworks in Sweden, that contained images of public artwork uploaded by the public.

 

The European Commission has been attempting to harmonize the laws of Freedom of Panorama throughout all its member states. This will change the practices in virtually all of the countries to make them consistent with French and Italian laws.  This is a development that needs to be closely followed to understand its impact on all artists, especially photographers, and anyone working in the artworld.

 

These are some of the new laws that are affecting the copyright status of artworks in both private and public collections, and in public spaces.  Know about these new realities so you can protect yourself and your intellectual property !

 

Topics include:

  • Copyright and How it Affects Corporate Art Collections
  • History of Copyright Law
  • Works for Hire and their Copyright Status
  • Creative Commons
  • Fair Use in Copyright
  • Visual Artists Rights (VARA)
  • Freedom of Panorama
  • Photographing Works of Art in Public Locations – a changing reality
  • California Resale Royalties Act
  • Tax Issues on the Ownership of Art

 

This 50 page report is available in a pdf format for $7.00

You can order below by clicking on the Buy Now button, and it will be sent to you via WeTransfer when your payment has been credited.  Orders will be filled within 24 hours.

 

I would like to order the Special Report on the Changing Legal Issues in Copyright.  — published in January  2018 for $ 7.00 US$


Thank you for your interest in our publications and website.

Editor: Shrley Reiff Howarth

Helping Artists While Helping the Environment

…..an artist in residence program that also helps the environment.

     Artists in residence programs have been proliferating,  and are very successful  because not only do they help the artists,  they can generate a body of work and art programs  related to a company’s activity.

A couple of years ago (December 2014), I featured an article about three artist in residence programs – Kohler, CERN, and the Recology Program.  I thought it was time to revisit the Recology program because it has a positive influence on not only providing artists with support and inspiration, but it is also going far to help recycling efforts in the San Francisco Bay area that ultimately are helping to restore the environment.  It is a truly innovative and visionary art program.

Recology is a recycling and waste disposal company in San Francisco. The Artist and Residence program has been providing  Bay Area artists with access to discarded materials, a stipend, and a large studio space at the Recology San Francisco Transfer Station.  By supporting artists who work with recycled materials, Recology hopes to encourage people to conserve natural resources and promote new ways of thinking about art and the environment.

The Beginnings of the Program

Jo Hanson, creator of the Artist in Residence program.

The Artist in Residence Program at Recology was established in 1990 at the same time that recycling was being implemented in the city and county of San Francisco.  Part of the  city’s plan was to design an education program to promote recycling and resource conservation. The SWMP and Recology San Francisco (then known as San Francisco Sanitary Fill Company) worked together to create informational ads and brochures about recycling, develop classroom presentations, and organize tours of recycling plants.

The goal was to teach people how to use curbside recycling bins and to encourage source reduction in order to promote a general awareness of how recycling helps protect the environment. Conceived by Jo Hanson, the Artist in Residence Program was the most innovative element of the education plan and the first program of its kind in the United States.  In the late 1980s Hanson suggested to Recology and the City of San Francisco that they develop an artist-in-residence program at the city dump which would offer studio space and stipends for emerging and established artists to create artwork from the waste stream and raise public awareness about environmental issues. Now more than twenty years later, the Artist in Residence Program has been nationally recognized and awarded, and countless artists, children, and adults have benefited from Jo Hanson’s vision.

One of the Artist in Residence for Fall 2017, Rodney Ewing

Jo was a guiding force for the program and served as a member of the program’s board from 1990 until she died in March, 2007.   The program has continued to expand and add new features, and since 1990, over 120 professional artists and 30 student artists have completed residencies. The studio is located at the San Francisco Solid Waste Transfer and Recycling Center (Recology San Francisco), a 47-acre facility that includes the trash transfer station (where trash goes before being sent to landfill), the Household Hazardous Waste Facility, the Organics Annex, the Public Disposal and Recycling Area (“The Dump”), and other recycling areas.  The facility is also the site for a three-acre sculpture garden containing work by former artists-in-residence.

by Cybele Lyle, 2017 artist in residence

The program has had four goals:

  • To encourage the reuse of materials
  • To support Bay Area artists by providing access to the wealth of materials available at the public dump
  • To encourage children and adults to think about their own consumption practices
  • To teach the public how to recycle and compost through classroom lessons that explain the city’s three-cart (recycling, composting, trash) system
Beth Krebs

As part of the program, artists speak to elementary school classes and adult tour groups about their experience of working with recycled materials, and when their residency is completed, the company hosts a three-day exhibition and reception to show the work they have completed.

Artists make three pieces of art for the company’s permanent art collection, and leave art created during the residency with the company for the next twelve months for exhibitions at off-site venues.  Current artists that completed their residencies in May are Cybele Lyle, Carrie Hott and Nathan Bryne.  Upcoming artists for 2017 include:  Rodney Ewing, Cathy Lu, Erik Scollon, and Beth Krebs.

The Sculpture Garden and Gardener in Residence Project

An experiment in biodiversity, Wild Apples for Jo is a bed of apple trees grown from seed. The garden installation is dedicated to the memory of Artist in Residence Program founder Jo Hanson and created by Susan Leibovitz Steinman

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The Sculpture Garden  is a private, three-acre facility that includes more than 35 sculptures made by former artists-in-residence, with new pieces added each year.  Each facility tour includes a visit to the garden. In 1992, under the direction and design of  Susan Leibovitz Steinman, Recology San Francisco built the sculpture garden on a hill overlooking San Francisco Bay. The land functions as a buffer between the SF Transfer Station and the adjacent residential neighborhood, known as Little Hollywood. It was previously a field of ivy and ice plant.

The garden path is made from recycled concrete salvaged from the Embarcadero Freeway when it was damaged in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. Bricks that line the path came from a building on Mission Street, and many of the plants in the garden were rescued from the garbage and brought back to life using Recology compost.

The goal of the Gardener in Residence Program (GIR) at Recology San Francisco is to bring awareness to the importance of native plant restoration, water conservation, and the value of compost as a soil amendment. The focus has been on  educating the public about sustainable landscape design techniques —  essential for reducing water useage and attracting native wildlife, such as bees and butterflies. Using the garden as a platform for educational outreach it is meant to encourage dialogue about these environmental issues.

The program provides experienced local gardeners and landscape designers with access to the Recology Sculpture Garden for site specific projects. In conjunction with Recology staff, the gardener-in-residence determines the appropriate areas for development within the three-acre sculpture garden, and will design and execute their plan by working hands-on in the garden. Projects are to incorporate drought-tolerant plantings, effective use of mulch and compost, and native plants.

——— ——— ———-

For more information, contact people for the Recology program are:
Deborah Munk: (415) 330-1415
Micah Gibson: (415) 330-1414
Sharon Spain: (415) 330-0747
Felisia Castaneda: (415) 330-9943
The mailing address is:  Artist in Residence Program, 501 Tunnel Avenue, San Francisco, CA 94134

The Recology website for the Artist in Residence Program is https://www.recology.com/recology-san-francisco/artist-in-residence-program/

Information on this and nearly 700 other corporate art programs and collections are included in the 2017 edition of the International Directory of Corporate Art Collections here.

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